Type 2 Diabetes; Causes and Solutions

  Technological progress is nested deeply within contemporary Western society, and has brought with it many conveniences gifted to its citizens; acute-care medicine, the combustion engine, mass food production, enhanced communications via smartphones, and instant access to information through the Internet, to name a few. Although such examples show technological prowess, they still remain but

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Osteoporosis and Strength Training

Shanb and Youssef (2014) provided evidence, which supported that physical activity and exercise could increase bone mass, balance, strength, mobility, and ultimately, higher quality of life. The authors conducted an experiment whereby 40 subjects (i.e., 27 females and 13 males) between 60-67 years old were randomly assigned to a control group (i.e., nonweight bearing activity)

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Rheumatoid Arthritis and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used to treat inflammation and pain associated with RA. However, a meta-analysis conducted by Lee, Bae, and Song (2012) suggested research supporting the role of omega-3 fatty acids (O3FAs) in reducing inflammation, with a particular influence upon the amounts of NSAIDs used in RA subjects. A meta-analysis is a

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Inflammation and Alzheimer’s Disease; Connecting the Dots

Simpson (2007) stated that the average person spends approximately 20-25 years asleep by age 70, and suggested that sleep quality and duration are essential to the maintenance of neurological function. Conversely, lack of sleep has been correlated to higher levels of inflammatory markers, in addition to compromised immune function, body temperature, renal function, and memory

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Limitations of Low Carbohydrate Diets

Modern Western diets tend to be rich in macronutrient sources from refined carbohydrates. In this author’s last assignment, the application of very low carbohydrate diets (VLCD) was explored as a means of treating metabolic syndrome (i.e., diabetes, poor blood lipid profiles, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and decreased insulin sensitivity) (Song, Lee, Song, Paik, & Song, 2014).

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Carbohydrate Restriction, Statins, and Improved Biomarkers

Statins are pharmacological interventions that have been shown to reduce dyslipidemia, inflammation, and improve vascular endothelial function (VEF) (Ballard et al., 2013). Interestingly, carbohydrate restricted diets (CRDs) have also been shown to improve blood biomarkers, similar to statins (Ballard et al., 2013). However, the authors noted that no research explored the potential additive benefits of

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Bone Broth and Lead Consumption

Monro and Puri (2013) stated that bone broths are becoming increasingly recommended to patients for: the gut and psychology syndrome (GAPS) diet for autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia, and as part of the paleolithic diet. Interestingly, the authors of this study indicated that bones tend to contain lead and boiling bones

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H. Pylori Bacteria and Nutrient Malabsorbtion

Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a gram-negative bacteria that has a global reach, infecting more than half of the world’s population (Franceschi et al., 2014). It is etiologically associated with atrophic gastritis (loss of gastric cells from inflammation), non-atrophic gastritis (inflammation with no loss of gastric cells), peptic ulcers, and shows a strong association with primary

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Intestinal Permeability and Glutamine

Increased intestinal permeability (IP) is correlated to several pathologies such as allergies, metabolic, and cardiovascular disturbances. As was discussed in previous posts, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic cir­culation (i.e., leaky gut) (Rapin & Weirnsperger, 2010). One particular cause of leaky gut is processed food consumption, and

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Insulin Resistance and Cinnamon

Metabolic syndrome is associated elevated glucose/lipids, inflammation, decreased anti-oxidant activity, weight gain, glycation of proteins, and insulin resistance (Qin, Panickar, & Anderson, 2010). Interestingly, the ingestion of simple spices, like cinnamon, has shown promise in helping control one manifestation of metabolic syndrome; insulin resistance. The following sections will consider, in more detail, the influence of

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Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Exercise

In addition to nutritional interventions, physical activity has also been shown to help control symptoms and complications of non-alcohol fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (Miyake et al., 2014). In the following sections, NAFLD and its relationship to exercise will be explored as another viable means of controlling the disease. Miyake et al. (2014) explored the connection

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Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, and Low Carbohydrate Diets; Exploring the Connection

Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a term used to describe a group of associated risk factors, that when combined, increase a person’s chances of contracting conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes (Kenney, Wilmore, & Costill, 2012). Said risk factors include a large waistline, high triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoproteins, high resting blood pressure, high

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Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

The liver is the largest organ in the body providing several vital functions such as storing glycogen, copper, iron, triglycerides, and lipid soluble vitamins (Reisner & Reisner, 2017). The liver is also responsible for synthesizing certain proteins such as albumin, which facilitates coagulation and inflammation, in addition to binding proteins for storage of substances (Reisner

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Androgen Replacement Therapy

Aging has been associated with many signs and symptoms observed in elderly men. Some of these symptoms include: decreases in work capacity, energy, strength, muscle mass, libido, sexual activity, nocturnal penile tumescence, virility, decreased bone density, increases in abdominal body fat, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis (Vermeulen, 2000). It is possible that some or all of

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Controlling Hypertension

In a study conducted by Subramian, Soudarssanane, Jayalakshmy, Thisusevakumar, Navasakthi, Sahai, and Saptharishi (2011), exercise, salt reduction, and yoga were explored to uncover their relative effectiveness of reducing hypertension. The following will consider the findings of Subramian et al. (2011). The researchers conducted a cross-over randomized controlled trial (RCT) of an earlier RCT (2007) in

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Urolithiasis and Nutrition; Exploring the Relationship

Calculi, commonly known as stones, can form anywhere along the urinary tract; a condition known as urolithiasis (Reisner & Reisner, 2017). Stones are characterized by high concentrations of uric acid or calcium salts, and emanate from three primary factors: high concentrations of salts in the urine, infection of the urinary tract, and urinary tract obstruction

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PCOS, Inflammation, and Fat Loss

In this author’s last post, polycysctic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) was explored and its relationship to metabolic syndrome. The following will continue to explore PCOS and its relationship to low-grade chronic inflammation (LGCI) and obesity. Sirmans and Pate (2014) indicated that weight loss could help control PCOS (control inflammation). Of particular interest is the biochemical relationship

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PCOS and Metabolic Syndrome; Exploring the Connection and Providing Solutions

  Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder among women in which 10% of the population is affected within the United States (Reisner & Reisner, 2017). PCOS is often diagnosed among females between 20-40 years of age, and is a prominent cause of anovulatory (no oocytes released during menstruation) infertility. PCOS is characterized by

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Dysmenorrhea, Inflammation, and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Dysmenorrhea is defined as painful menstruation and is characterized by two types: primary dysmenorrhea characterized by no disease (PD) and secondary dysmenorrhea (SD), which is characterized by diseased organs within the pelvic regions (Reisner & Reisner, 2017). The following sections will explore dysmenorrhea in greater detail, in addition to nutritional interventions to help

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Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

As was mentioned in my last post, genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors have been correlated to breast cancer and estrogen production. Said factors include: poor detoxification, environmental toxins (PCB’s, cadmium), genetic polymorphisms (specifically COMPT and CYP1B1) for breast cancer, a diet consisting of increased fat and protein and low fiber intake, lack of sleep, decreased

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Exercise, Estrogen, and Breast Cancer

Several factors (genetic, lifestyle, and environmental) have been linked with estrogen production; a hormone closely related to the growth and development of breast cancer. (Pizzorno & Katzinger, 2012). Thus, modulating such factors might help in controlling breast cancer proliferation (as part of a complete treatment). As a means of appreciating elements, which influence breast cancer

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Improving Air Quality In Your Home

  Poor indoor air quality is a chief cause of illness for individuals (Williams, 2012). Buildings are generally tightly sealed designed to conserve energy. However, contaminants from paint, carpets, and other building materials become trapped and circulate causing symptoms such as headaches, sore throat, and respiratory problems (Williams, 2012). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are common indoor air

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Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infants

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a leading cause of both infant morbidity and mortality worldwide (Zlotkin, 2003). Moreover, children moderately deficient in iron consumption may not only momentarily experience symptoms such as depressed mental and motor development; it may be irreversible (Zlotkin, 2003). Such a situation demands a preventative paradigm rather that reactive approach. The

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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  Emphysema and chronic bronchitis often occur together. When they do, such a disorder is known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (Reisner & Reisner, 2017). COPD is often characterized by dyspnea (shortness of breath) and cyanosis (blue skin from reduced hemoglobin in blood). Individuals suffering from COPD will frequently have shortness of breath (emphysema),

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Hemophilia and Exercise

Hemophilia and Exercise Having considered the characteristics, causes, and medical treatment of hemophilia, I would like to present other interventions to compliment traditional allopathic medicine for the aforementioned disease. Thus, the following sections will briefly explore physical activity and its beneficial relationship to hemophilia. Lombet, Lambert, and Hermans (2016) stated that individuals with hemophilia were

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Another Course Bites the Dust

Nutr-122 (Intro to Biochemistry)- Completed. This was a solid re-introduction to general chemistry/biochemistry done through the University of Bridgeport. The biochemistry really provided a great opportunity to “get my toes wet” with the underlying events that take place internally when the body interacts with basic nutrients. It was a tough course but worth it. -Michael

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